Following the success of last year’s series of Sta-Sof-Fro Seminars, the #WearYou campaign returns in 2019. The “Wear You” movement is a meeting of the minds for women from all walks of life. The seminar aims to celebrate #versatyle women, while sharing a wealth of knowledge about key topics. One of the panelists, Sunshine Shibambo, tells us what she is looking forward to most. 

Your hairstyles are always creative and trendsetting for black women in SA. What inspired your hair journey and how do you choose each hairstyle that you do?

My hairstyles are usually inspired by what’s happening in my life at the moment. I recently got faux dreadlocks to wear at the 25th Essence Music Festival in New Orleans. I wanted to stand out from the typical “black American” in their weaves, wigs and clip-ons that would be at the festival. It always starts with the hair and it helped me bring my African hipster vibe to life. I packed each piece of clothing, shoes and accessories with my hair in mind.

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The Sta-Sof-Fro Salon Seminars encourage women to embrace their personal journeys and truths, reminding all that it’s okay to #WearYou. How do you “Wear You” each day?

I “Wear Me” the only way I know how, and that’s by being authentic in my words, actions and intentions. I’m always open to learning and live in constant curiosity, which has opened me up to a constantly exciting life. Yes, I face challenges and difficulties daily, but I’ve made a conscious decision to only concern myself with what I can control. As a result, I found my confidence late in my twenties and appreciated myself when the 30s landed. I feel more grounded and liberated, more beautiful and wiser now, than I ever have in my life. 

What hair products can you not do without to maintain any of your hairstyles? 

I use Sta-Sof-Fro Hi-Sheen Polish Spray Mist when I braid or cornrow my hair daily. Amla Oil and MPL Hair Oil keep my hairline and Afro thick and soft. Shea Moisture Avocado Pudding Conditioner takes care of my hair under my wigs.

What do you wish you knew about hair when you were growing up?

I wish I knew that Sodium lauryl sulphate is a cheap foaming agent that’s widely used in shampoo. Sulphates are effective for straight hair because they cleanse grease and dirt, but they don’t work for curls because they strip natural oils from the strands. These products damage natural hair and half the products that were available to us in the early 90s were not good for natural or black hair in general. Many older black women have hair issues today because of that.

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What do you look forward to speaking to women about at the Sta- Sof-Fro seminar in Durban and Johannesburg this year?

I look forward to speaking about rising up from the hood; how growing up in the township created a hustler mentality; using your background as your resource; breaking stereotypes and expectations; personal branding and using what you have to get your name out there. I’ll talk about influencer opportunities in the new South Africa; women in business after a corporate career; what I wish I’d known before I started in business; the journey to female power; building self-confidence and personal grooming. 

Join the conversation and Sunshine Shibambo, alongside other panelists like musician and producer Rorisang Thandekiso, Dr Nandipha Sekeleni, fitness guru Mapule Ndhlovu, media personalities Palesa Masiteng, Nelisiwe Masango, media personality Chef Nti and Mamakashaka’s Nandi Dlepu.

This year’s seminars will take place in Durban on 26-27 July and in Johannesburg on 30-31 August.