You have probably noticed how singer Simphiwe Dana has subtly changed her image to a younger, sexier and fresher look over the past year.

In an interview with Move!, she reveals how this change wasn’t just an exterior facelift but it all forms part of dealing with her struggle with depression and chasing happiness in her life.

READ MORE: “You’re as good as your last performance”- Simphiwe Dana

TAMING HER DEPRESSION

When she released her first album in 2004, Zandisile, Simphiwe was always unconventional in how she dressed, her make-up and her big hair. A year ago, she cut her hair short and dyed it blonde.

“As someone who lives with depression, I like the idea of reinventing myself – the idea of a fresh start. Though deep down I am always myself, I always shed what no longer serves me on an emotional level. Therefore, the changes on the inside are sometimes mimicked by a change in appearance as well,” she says.

Simphiwe, who is not ashamed to talk about her depression, says there is really no formula for dealing with it.

“We all have different triggers and different remedies for it. But I believe creating safe and happy environments is key. Surrounding yourself with loved ones who understand your condition can also help,” she says.

The 38-year-old mother-of-two plans to be sexier going forward. She says, “I feel like I’m getting into a sexy phase of my evolution. I have never felt sexier than I feel now. I feel I’m finally growing into the woman I’ve always wanted to be. Circumstances made me grow up faster than my real age. Now I’m finally growing up on my own terms,” Simphiwe says.

The Eastern Cape-born star is set to release an album this year but bringing sexy into her life will not affect the classic feel, honesty and sincerity in her music.

“There will be no out of character change in my music, only growth and experimentation as I’ve always done,” she says.

READ MORE: Game of Thrones star Sophie Turner says she frequently thought about suicide during depression when she started on the show

BEING GRATEFUL

Simphiwe has a lot to be grateful for in her life. She’s fortunate in that she doesn’t need to release albums every other year because her name still remains alive.

“I’m grateful that I still value honesty and integrity above all things. I’m grateful that after all these years, I still have a reverence for music that makes me see the divine element that heals,” she says.

One other role she dearly loves is that of being a mother to two teens, a girl and a boy. “My kids taught me unconditional love. And I practice this love on others, both deserving and undeserving,” she says.