Well, one social media user found herself in a similar situation when a man she had met on a train texted her a week later.

Taking to Twitter to share her strange encounter, England-based Lynda, posted screenshots from the conversation she had with a guy named Josh, who she had met on a train a week prior.

When ‘Josh’ introduced himself to her on Imessenger, Lynda immediately asked where he had gotten her number from , to which he said he would only reveal the name of Lynda’s friend who gave him her number when they went out for lunch that Thursday.

“So, I briefly spoke to someone on the train last week, we didn’t even exchange socials or anything and today he messaged me. Am I overreacting by being creeped out because what on earth,” she captioned the post.

READ MORE: Your apps could be watching you and recording your conversations – study finds

Although Lynda managed to brush the guy off after explaining to him how his stalkerish behaviour made her feel uncomfortable, many social media users felt that the man was stalking her and that she should report him to the police.

READ MORE: This woman uploading footage of her stalker proves that women still have a long way to go before they’re believed

In South Africa many women find themselves in a similar situations where they are harassed and stalked by men and according to Power FM, there’s little women can do to protect themselves against stalkers unless the victim has been directly threatened or harmed by the stalker or if the stalker has harassed the person on social media – only then can legal action be taken.

Health24 reports that victims of stalkers may suffer from depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. The publication also advised that people who suspect that they may have a stalker, should never form a close relationship with the stalker but rather calmly tell the stalker that they would not like to have any type of relationship with them and if the behaviour persists, then the stalker should be reported to the police.