That is, according to the Beauty Pass - the app that was created to supposedly make the lives of the beautiful easier by offering them free passes at certain restaurants, gym clubs and even their travelling fees get covered. Business Insider covered the story here.

The app also offers those of us who are willing (but not beautiful?) the chance to visit the places where these models will pop up - it's a feature that allows users of the app to see where the "bp models" have checked in.

According to their website their "live" map enables you to see when members are "checked in" or when they have made a reservation at a venue. A link to the venue's web page allows you to get all the info you need to make a reservation or simply show up."

It seems a little creepy and wouldn't it place those models in an unsafe position?

READ MORE: This is how social network apps affect your mood

For too long, marketing and advertising companies have used this (access to beauty) tool to help people part with their money, no questions asked.

And to their credit, it works. Isn't that why we have influencers who are celebrated along with celebrities and industry experts? How many of us have bought a product or service because our favourite and most glamorous celeb was seen using it in a staged TV and now even instagram or Twitter ad.

READ MORE: Avon Canada apologises for "dimples are cute on your face" but "not on your thighs" ad that offended many

However, personally, it seems this app is filled with as many holes as a rice strainer.

Not only does the app create or rather reinforce the idea that beautiful people deserve special treatment or as we call it in these streets pretty privilege, it also potentially endangers the lives of these BP models by revealing their locations to absolute strangers.

READ MORE: This woman uploading footage of her stalker proves that women still have a long way to go before they’re believed

The site does not specify whether these young women will have actual security or chaperones.

So what makes a BP model?

After visiting their Instagram page, my worst fears are confirmed. Beautiful to them is long legged, flat tummied and straight haired. Not a single 'plus sized' or freckled faced beauty in sight. 

READ MORE: Zoe Kravitz: 'Unfair beauty standards lead to low self-esteem among women'

Unsurprisingly beautiful black women are also underrepresented... While it is certainly not a new realisation that the advertising and marketing industry uses society's unhealthy obsession with beauty and all the perks of being beautiful to sell products, we wonder whether all those busy activists and charity as well as NGO workers wouldn't mind a free meal for all the hard work they're doing to change the world.

So we know that beauty has a premium. In an article for The Cut Drake Baer, writes  about beautiful people having a different experience of life: "Digging into the psychology literature, there’s ample evidence that super-hot people are indeed perceived differently. They get ahead in life in many ways (spoiler alert: teachers call on cute kids), but they run into problems all their own."

And he talks about the 'beauty premium', "which states that the wealth gap between the hot and the not is like those between sexes and ethnicities. That’s a long-term result of the halo effect: If someone is 'easy on the eyes,' the enjoyment we derive from looking at them colours our perceptions of other attributes. The research says we’re more likely to view them as intelligent, healthy, and socially capable simply because they look good."

And give them free meals too.

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