The magazine has once again been accused of cultural appropriation, with followers saying they should have just hired a black model to do the job, instead of adding black features on a white model. One follower, according to Page Six, wrote:

“Why didn’t you get someone with an actual afro and freckles to model for you instead? If y’all wanted a model that didn’t look white y’all could’ve booked a girl of colour.”

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When other followers raised a counter argument that black models often straighten and dye their hair for shoots, so this shouldn’t be a problem either, one follower commented:

“The discussion is more about the double standard that there is towards Afro hair and black culture. There are negative connotations surrounding actual black people who have this hair (or other things that are a part of black culture) however, conveniently when a white person does it, it is suddenly ‘fashionable’ or en vogue. The thing about straight hair or blonde hair is that it’s already part of the western beauty standards ideal, so there’s no double standard.”

In a statement to Page Six, Vogue defended themselves, saying they did not mean any harm:

“The image is meant to be an update of the romantic Edwardian/Gibson Girl hair which suits the period feel of the Brock Collection, and also the big hair of the ’60s and the early ’70s, that puffed-out, teased-out look of those eras. We apologize if it came across differently than intended, and we certainly did not mean to offend anyone by it.”

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Kendall also posted the pics on her own Instagram account, and some of her followers wrote:

“Let me guess, white peoples started the Afro and Locs now lmao ?? pathetic. Stop perpetuating black culture and develop your own thanks.”

“I think many people with naturally curly, afros etc. will feel offended by this.”