The Apposphere study, which interviewed 1 005 app users between the ages of 13 and 44, revealed that there’s a direct link between your mood and the apps you use. And, there are specific reasons why users open different apps at different times of the day.  

Speaking on the aim of the research, Snap Inc. head of consumer insights Amy Moussavi said: “In a world with so many apps available to us, we wanted to better understand the roles each platform plays in consumers’ lives. Through this research, we learned that each of the apps tested elicits vastly different emotions and experiences in the lives of its users. For instance, 95 percent of Snapchatters say the app makes them feel happy, more than any other app tested.”

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In an article in Adweek, it’s reported that participants of the study were asked how they feel when on Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube, Twitter and Facebook. Some of the emotions that Snapchat users felt while on the app included being happy, silly, playful and attractive. 

Twitter users, on the other hand, confessed that the app often left them feeling anxious, isolated and overwhelmed. Facebook users reported feelings of guilt, isolation and loneliness.

How social network apps affect your mood

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Reasons why users tap on each app:

•    Snapchat – to foster conversations between close friends and play with fun filters

•    Twitter  – to keep abreast of current events or follow topical discussions

•    YouTube – to practically learn about new products or techniques

•    Facebook – to stay in touch with family and get updates on events

•    Instagram – to get the latest influencer and celebrity content

On the time users spend on the apps, the Apposphere study found that, “Snapchat, followed by Twitter, are the apps most used while on-the-go, commuting, socialising, and shopping,” reports For Business.

However, when users are more relaxed, they’re likely to get onto Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.

So, the next time you go onto your social media apps, ask yourself: how will I feel after scrolling down?

Reporting: For Business, Adweek