Listen proactively

Author and contributor on forbes.com Glenn Llopsis says because you’re still learning the ropes and getting used to your new title don’t sideline the older generation because they usually want to be heard. Listen and take their input as seriously as you would with the millennials. Identify their strengths through their daily behavior. Things like, do they ask questions and what kind of questions do they ask? Do they take notes? And identify specific things you can learn from each other.

Be prepared to answer the ‘how old are you’ question

While other people find it uncomfortable to answer this question, as a new young leader you should be prepared to answer it truthfully and confidently. Don’t try to tweak your age to sound and come across more mature. Set a confident tone from the beginning and the only choice they’ll have is to be confident in your leadership as well.

Know when to delegate

Being young doesn’t mean you should do everything yourself.  A good leader knows how to get the job done and when to assign tasks to the team. According to Prof. Scott Williams a Business lecturer  from the University of Buffalo  states that delegating is a more of a good thing than you think. It reassures your team that you trust their abilities.

Choose the best management style

According to the American Management Association people born between the years 1965 and 1980 are referred to as the generation X also known as the ‘slackers’ generation because they question authority. This research also shows that due to a decline in population at that time, this generation posess  strong technical skills and are more independent than all the other generations. 

Over and above, they also like balancing work and personal life, so when managing this generation ensure that it’s in line with this.