• Vogue Editor-in-Chief, Anna Wintour, has issued an apology to black staff at Condé Nast.
  • She admitted that there are "too few" black employees at the company. 
  • Despite saying she takes full responsibility for the mistakes at Vogue, she will not be resigning or get fired by Condé Nast execs.

Following widespread rumours that Condé Nast’s most famous employee, Anna Wintour, would leave Vogue after 32 years amid a diversity scandal, execs have cleared the air.

According to Los Angeles Magazine, it was expected that the 70-year-old's job would be taken over by Edward Enninful, the 48-year-old Black editor who currently runs British Vogue.

However, execs have confirmed that she is not resigning and will not be ousted after she finally admitted that Vogue hasn't done enough for black people in its 128 years of existence.

She acknowledged in a note to staff that “it can’t be easy to be a black employee at Vogue.”

"I want to start by acknowledging your feelings and expressing my empathy towards what so many of you are going through; sadness, hurt, and anger too," the fashion industry bigwig said.

READ MORE: Kourtney Kardashian is sharing the mic with black women and teaching her kids about white privilege

"I want to say this especially to the black members of our team - I can only imagine what these days have been like. But I also know that the hurt and violence and injustice we're seeing and talking about have been around for a long time. Recognising it and doing something about is overdue," she told Page Six

"I want to say plainly that I know Vogue has not found enough ways to elevate and give space to black editors, writers, photographers, designers, and other creators," Anna's apology continues. 

"We have made mistakes too, publishing images or stories that have been hurtful or intolerant. I take full responsibility for those mistakes. It can't be easy to be a black employee at Vogue and there are too few of you. I know that it is not enough to say we'll do better, but we will. 

"And please know that I value your voices and responses as we move forward. I am listening and would like to hear your feedback and advice if you would like to share either."

A few weeks ago, longtime Vogue contributing editor, André Leon Talley, accused Anna - his close friend and boss of 30 years - of perpetuating a racist environment at Conde Nast and in the broader fashion world.

Anna's job might be safe for now, but some of the most powerful media figures, including the opinion editor of the New York Times and top editors at Bon Appétit, the Philadelphia Inquirer, and Refinery 29, have lost their jobs amid workplace diversity issues under their watch.

Compiled by Afika Jadezweni

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